Tuesday, February 18, 2020

MAKEUP & HAIRSTYLING - OSCAR WEEK 2020

José Alberto Hermosillo
Makeup & Hairstyling - Oscar Week www.FestivalinLA.com

For the 92nd Academy Awards, the Academy implemented a few new rules, such as increasing the number of nominated films in the Makeup & Hairstyling category, from three to five. 

With more nominees, the competition is stimulating. However, the foundation of the category remained unchanged, taking into consideration the pre-established literary genres they always do, such as contemporary & drama, time-period & horror, and Sci-Fi & fantasy.

After viewing the 344, seven minutes “baked-off reels,” highlighting the quality in Makeup & Hairstyling, members evaluate the eligibility and attributions of each movie. Then, the Academy announces the shortlist of ten semi-finalists, to name the five final films on Nomination Day.

The Academy established the Makeup & Hairstyling branch in 1982. Recognizing the outstanding work of Rick Baker in the film “An American Werewolf in London” as the first Oscar winner.


Rick Baker is a legendary Makeup Artist, seven times Oscar winner. His body of work includes An American Werewolf in Paris, Planet of the Apes, Men in Black, Ed Wood. Photo: Gabriel Romero ©2019 Festival in LA

Since then, Mr. Baker has won six more times. His second Oscar was for “Harry and the Hendersons” in 1988. The extraordinary work executed in Tim Burton’s “Ed Wood” earned him his third award in 1994. He won again for “The Nutty Professor” in 1996, “Men in Black” in 1997, “How the Grinch Stole Christmas” in 2000, and “The Wolfman” in 2011.

Makeup & Hairstyling. Photo José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA

And the nominees for Outstanding Makeup & Hairstyling are:

“Bombshell” Kazu Hiro, Anne Morgan, and Vivian Baker. (WINNER).
“Joker” Nicki Ledermann and Kay Georgiou
“Judy” Jeremy Woodhead
“Maleficent: Mistress of Evil” Paul Gooch, Arjen Tuiten, and David White
“1917” Naomi Donne, Tristan Versluis, and Rebecca Cole
    Makeup & Hairstyling. Photo José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA

    “Bombshell” 
    Oscar Winners:
    Kazu Hiro, Anne Morgan, and Vivian Baker

    “Bombshell” recounts the scandal over the sexual harassment charges against Roger Ailes, president of Fox News, by a group of female employees.

    The makeup department exhaustively researched a massive amount of books and photo files to recreate each character to perfection. Actors were a big help in achieving the desired look.

    Eye makeup was crucial in the creation of every character. The shape of the eyes was essential to give form and expression to the rest of the face. 

    The stunning haircuts and the dramatic prosthetics were vital in achieving the look.  They defused the makeup with an airbrush. This process was pre-established with digital technology and 3D prints.

    The team had three hours to apply the makeup to 90 different characters. They used heavy-forced makeup to accomplish the specific look of a “Barbie Doll” for some of the main actresses.
    Vivian Baker, Anne Morgan, and Kazu Hiro, Makeup Artis nominees, Bombshell.  Photo: José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
    Bombshell makeup display. Photo: José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
    Bombshell makeup & hairstyling display Photo: José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
    Bombshell. Photo: José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
    Bombshell. Photo José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
    Vivian Baker, Anne Morgan, and Kazu Hiro, Makeup Artis nominees, Bombshell.  Photo: José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
      Kazu Hiro, Makeup Artis OSCAR WINNER for Bombshell.  Photo José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA

    “Joker”
    Oscar nominees:
    Nicki Ledermann and Kay Georgiou

    Inspired in Marvel’s iconic arch-nemesis, “Joker” is the story of one of the most famous anti-heroes in literature. The film focuses on the psychology of the character from its initial transformation into a public enemy.

     “Joker’s” Oscar nomination for Best Makeup & Hairstyling can be academic at first. The truth is that the creation of the character was much more complicated.

    The makeup & hair department spent months of planning, logistics, and copyright clearances, from the studio and from the clown itself, which is a registered trademark.

    The collaboration between director Todd Phillips and actor Joaquin Phoenix achieved the Joker's final look. Joaquin lost so much weight that made his characterization impeccable.

    Talented makeup artist Nicki Ledermann (“The Greatest Showman” and “The Irishman”) spoke about the layers of makeup she had to apply to Joaquin’s character, and how she had to be aware of continuity. For the bloody scenes, she used different types of products, including solvable or waterproof makeup.

    The Joker's hair demanded a very distinctive tone of green. Hairstylist Kay Georgiou went to the produce section of a nearby market and found the perfect broccoli green color.

    They applied wigs and makeup in 15 minutes every day. The clown makeup was used 30 days out of the 60 days of the shooting schedule.

    Nicki Ledermann, makeup artist nominee, Joker. Photo José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
    Joker's hair's color: Broccoli green.  
    Photo: José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
     Joker makeup & hairstyling display.  
    Photo: José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
    Joker makeup & hairstyling display. 
     Photo: José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
     Joker makeup & hairstyling display.  
    Photo: José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
    Joker makeup & hairstyling display.  
    Photo José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
     "Joker" makeup & hairstyling, Oscar nominee.  
    Photo José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
    Nicki Ledermann, makeup artist nominee, Joker. Film critic José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA

    “Judy” 
    Oscar nominee: 
    Jeremy Woodhead

    “Judy” is the tumultuous biopic of Judy Garland that focuses on her last trip to London in 1968. Renée Zellweger gives an Oscar-worthy performance portraying the legendary actress of "The Wizard of Oz."

    In charge of the stupendous makeup & hairstyling design is Jeremy Woodhead. For the characterization, he used prosthetics, wigs, and contact lenses. The makeup process transforming Renée into Judy took two hours every day with staggering results.
    Judy display. Photo: José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
    Judy display. Photo: José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA

    “Maleficent: Mistress of Evil” 
    Oscar nominees: 
    Paul Gooch, Arjen Tuiten and David White

    In Disney’s “Maleficent: Mistress of Evil,” the dark forces doomed the family ties between Maleficent and her goddaughter Princess Aurora. New allies and evil characters will try to impede the nuptials. Envy, ambition, and prejudices play a big part in this fantastic flick.

    The design of the makeup & hairstyling of “Maleficent: Mistress of Evil” required prosthetics, hair, horns, and a good foundation. The entire composition took two to five hours to apply to most of the actors. 

    The design of the faces had to match the environment harmoniously. They camouflaged their appearance with fur and feathers accordingly.

    The most challenging task for the makeup department was continuity. During the dramatic scenes, they had to match one take to the other. For Angelina’s lips, forty shades of red were not good enough; she wanted a more specific type of red. 

    The makeup department paid close attention to detail. The hands and nails of the female characters were oil paintings. For the male characters, they used silicone prosthetics.
    Arjen Tuiten, makeup artist nominee. Maleficent: Mistress of Evil. 
    Photo José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
    Maleficent: Mistress of Evil. Photo: José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
    Maleficent: Mistress of Evil. Photo: José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
      Maleficent: Mistress of Evil. Photo José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
    Maleficent: Mistress of Evil makeup display. Photo José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
    Maleficent: Mistress of Evil. Photo: José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
    Arjen Tuiten makeup artist nominee for Maleficent: Mistress of Evil.  Film critic José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA

    “1917” 
    Oscar nominees: 
    Naomi Donne, Tristan Versluis, and Rebecca Cole


    In “1917,” two young soldiers are commissioned to deliver a crucial message to the front line to save hundreds on April 6, 1917, during WW I. As the story progresses in this war-movie, the challenges for the makeup and hair department were enormous. 

    To get the real facts, the makeup artists went to the Imperial War Museum in London to research the human anatomy and composition of the diverse ethnicities represented in the film. They did an exhaustive examination of medical books and photographs, focusing on facial and body hair, broken teeth, and even how the soldiers bled at that time. Coincidentally, the British Museum was founded in 1917 as well.

    The film unfolds in one take. In reality, the filmmakers did it in 30 continuous shots. The makeup crew had a very short amount of time to work with the actors - for the bleeding scenes; they built a rig to pump the blood on cue automatically under their uniforms.

    Another fascinating challenge was the use of the "blending point." The blending point is a technique used in movies to camouflage editing. In this epic war-flick, the makeup department had to utilize this approach to make a character turn “blue” when he dies. 
    1917 makeup display. Photo: José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
    1917 makeup display. Photo: José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
    1917 makeup display. Photo: José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
    "1917" dental implants, makeup display. Photo José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
    Photo: José Alberto Hermosillo ©2019 Festival in LA
    Naomi Donne, Oscar nominee for "1917.."
     Photo: Gabriel Romero ©2019 Festival in LA
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