Friday, July 1, 2016

“Argentina” is more than Tango in the New Documentary Directed by Carlos Saura

By Jose Alberto Hermosillo

“Argentina” is an exhibition of high art and great beauty in a delightful documentary

The magical journey of music, rhythms, dance, and folklore of the South American country is an extraordinary voyage that starts with the enlightenment of “The Muleteers/Los muleteros” who, with their mules and horses, worked the Andean region spreading those rhythms.


Influenced by Africa, Italy, Poland, Brazil, and Los Andes, the Argentinean music has many styles and different rhythms that are also known as samba, samba alegre, vidala, chacarera, malambos, valsecitos, coplas, and folklorist.  

In the film, the astonishing theatrical staging showcases those dances with an admirable choreography.

In dancing, the basic steps of classic valet are infused with modern jazz and placed together into the Argentinean folklore. 


Los Chalchaleros performed the most affecting traditional songs in their original and/or current versions. 

“Argentina” features some of the most popular folk singers such as Mercedes SosaEl Chaqueño Palavecino, Soledad Pastorutti ("La Sole"), Liliana Herrero, Luis Salinas, Jaime Torres, Jairo, and the folk group Metabombo.

The dancers include Ballet Nuevo Arte Nativo de Koki and Pajarín Saavedra.

It is beautiful to see, in the film, a younger generation to bring a heartfelt tribute to one of the greatest promoters of the Argentinean music in the world, Mercedes Sosa, with one of her greatest hits “Changes, everything changes/Cambia, todo cambia.”  

The Malambo tableaux is epic!

The legendary Spanish director Carlos Saura, “Cría Cuervos” (1976) and “Ay Carmela” (1990), among others magnificent films, delivers his fifth musical work: “Carmen,” “Flamenco,” “Tango,” “Fados,” and now “Argentina.”

Saura's cinematic vision continues exploring the telluric connection between song and soul, music and movements, colors and shapes.

The accomplished Spanish director in “Argentina” is to be able to translate to the screen the music, dance, and moves in a cinematic feast of color and energy.

“Argentina” is passion, “Argentina” es amor, "Argentina" es mucho corazon.

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